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lohrien:

The Wizard of Oz by Lorena Alvarez Gómez (Part I)

(via oldfilmsflicker)

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"Ben Barres is a biologist at Stanford who lived and worked as Barbara Barres until he was in his forties. For most of his career, he experienced bias, but didn’t give much weight to it—seeing incidents as discrete events. (When he solved a tough math problem, for example, a professor said, “You must have had your boyfriend solve it.”) When he became Ben, however, he immediately noticed a difference in his everyday experience: “People who don’t know I am transgendered treat me with much more respect,” he says. He was more carefully listened to and his authority less frequently questioned. He stopped being interrupted in meetings. At one conference, another scientist said, “Ben gave a great seminar today—but then his work is so much better than his sister’s.” (The scientist didn’t know Ben and Barbara were the same person.) “This is why women are not breaking into academic jobs at any appreciable rate,” he wrote in response to Larry Summers’s famous gaffe implying women were less innately capable at the hard sciences. “Not childcare. Not family responsibilities,” he says. “I have had the thought a million times: I am taken more seriously.”"

Why Aren’t Women Advancing At Work? Ask A Transgender Person | Jessica Nordell for The New Republic (via gaywrites)

Incredible.

(via 92subaru)

(via paigelfinch)

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magical-unicorn-idina-menzel:

I love and seriously respect that Idina realizes that she’s tweeting to young, impressionable girls that really will believe her when she tells them they are beautiful!

(via tyleroakley)

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tastefullyoffensive:

[collegehumor]
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(Source: busbyway, via marykatewiles)

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airudite:

stairs coming home by jrobertblack on Flickr.
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moleskinelovers:

Popcorn cloud flowers.
Winter Thursday

moleskinelovers:

Popcorn cloud flowers.

Winter Thursday

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"When minor characters who are also ethnic minorities start talking among themselves in their native tongues, they sometimes take advantage of their invisibility to say things. Sometimes they break the Fourth Wall and start ranting about the movie director. Sometimes, they spout random obscenities or natter about their lousy lunch. It’s all in not-English, so whatever they say doesn’t matter! And the actual translations of their lines can be a secret source of hilarity in films where actors are instructed to use a Gratuitous Foreign Language (GFL) in order to make a scene sound more authentic. When some Native Americans cast in Westerns were told to speak their own language to add some authenticity, these actors took the opportunity to crudely editorialize about their director, which allegedly resulted in Native American audiences (in)explicably cracking up laughing during scenes that were meant to be dramatic."

Minorities can be marginalized in film, but not silenced. (via salon)

(via starrchildlemon)

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mondozuryuu:

rabblerowser:

skilledcunnilinguist:

silver-whale:

This is unspeakably perfect.

I died.

I guess you could say this moment was stone cold gold

yes

mondozuryuu:

rabblerowser:

skilledcunnilinguist:

silver-whale:

This is unspeakably perfect.

I died.

I guess you could say this moment was stone cold gold

yes

(via starrchildlemon)

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aceofstars:

rayvenloaf:

OMFG this is brilliant

I HAVE BEEN LAUGHING AT THIS FOR LIKE 10 MINUTES STRAIGHT OH MY GODD

aceofstars:

rayvenloaf:

OMFG this is brilliant

I HAVE BEEN LAUGHING AT THIS FOR LIKE 10 MINUTES STRAIGHT OH MY GODD

(Source: zubbyzub, via starrchildlemon)

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brandomarlons:

I don’t think that people generally realise what motion picture industry has done to the American Indian, as a matter of fact, all ethnic groups, all minorities, all non-whites. And people just simply don’t realise, just take it for granted that that’s the way people are going to be presented and these clichés are just, I mean on this network every night, well perhaps not every night, but you can see silly renditions of human behaviour, the leering Filipino houseboy, the wily Japanese, the kook or the gook, black man, stupid Indian. It just goes on and on and on. And people actually don’t realise how deeply people are injured by seeing themselves represented, not so much the adults, who are already inured to that kind of pain and pressure, but children. Indian children seeing Indians represented as savage, as ugly, as nasty, vicious, treacherous, drunken. They grow up only with a negative image of themselves and it lasts a lifetime. 

Marlon Brando on why Sacheen Littlefeather presented a speech on his behalf during his Best Actor win for The Godfather at the 1973 Academy Awards

(via starrchildlemon)

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fuckitfireeverything:

surprise
who would have thought anyone would get sick of Rich White Man Saves the World: the sequel

fuckitfireeverything:

surprise

who would have thought anyone would get sick of Rich White Man Saves the World: the sequel

(via gifmebeor)